CGIAR Research Program on Wheat (WHEAT)

Joining advanced science with field-level research and extension in lower- and middle-income countries, the CGIAR Research Program on Wheat (WHEAT) works with public and private organizations worldwide to raise the productivity, production and affordable availability of wheat for 2.5 billion resource-poor producers and consumers who depend on the crop as a staple food.

WHEAT is led by the International Maize and Wheat Improvement Center (CIMMYT), with the International Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas (ICARDA) as a primary research partner.

Funding for WHEAT comes from CGIAR and national governments, foundations, development banks and other public and private agencies, in particular the Australian Centre for International Agricultural Research (ACIAR), the UK Department for International Development (DFID) and the United States Agency for International Development (USAID).

https://wheat.org/

Capacity development
News

Workshop participants learned how to use the latest in technology to identify and keep track of the deadly Wheat Blast disease.

Climate adaptation and mitigation
News

New scientific research into “layering” climate smart agriculture techniques shows promise, demonstrating the potential for crop adaptability to climate change.

News

Winners of the Jeanie Borlaug Laube Women in Triticum (WIT) Early Career Award joined an on-going wheat research training course organized by CIMMYT.

Nutrition, health and food security
Features

Crop genetic gains remain too low, and international scientists are making a concerted effort to determine how best to increase yields.

News

Malnutrition is rising again and becoming more complex, according to the director-general of the world’s leading public maize and wheat research center.

Nutrition, health and food security
Climate adaptation and mitigation
Features

New insurance products geared towards smallholder farmers can help them recover their losses, and even encourage investment in climate-resilient innovations.

News

People who eat whole grain foods have a lower risk of almost all chronic diseases and are less likely to gain weight as they age, according to nutritionist Julie Miller Jones.

Innovations
News

CIMMYT scientists will present at the COP 13 conference on a new collection of tools and resources that could revolutionize maize breeding and promote genetic diversity conservation.

Nutrition, health and food security