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Innovations

Working with smallholders to understand their needs and build on their knowledge, CIMMYT brings the right seeds and inputs to local markets, raises awareness of more productive cropping practices, and works to bring local mechanization and irrigation services based on conservation agriculture practices. CIMMYT helps scale up farmers’ own innovations, and embraces remote sensing, mobile phones and other information technology. These interventions are gender-inclusive, to ensure equitable impacts for all.

News

Renowned CIMMYT plant breeder recognized for elite wheat varieties that reduced the risk of a global pandemic and now feed hundreds of millions of people around the world.

In the media

Source: Grain Central (13 Oct 2021)

Alison Bentley spoke with Grain Central about CIMMYT’s breeding strategy and the use of CIMMYT germplasm in the Australian wheat-growing industry.

News

CIMMYT is offering a new set of improved maize hybrids to partners, to scale up production for farmers in the region.

Features

Review proposes ways to accelerate climate resilience of staple crops, by integrating proven breeding methods with cutting-edge technologies.

Features

Successful establishment of an agricultural machinery workshop in Meki signals a boost for private sector-driven mechanization in Ethiopia.

News

Researchers found that prediction performance was highest using a multi-trait model.

News

Meeting highlights new varieties, production growth and strengthened collaboration through Accelerating Genetic Gains in Maize and Wheat (AGG) project.

Features

Researchers study the design, delivery and use of digital decision-support tools for smallholder maize farmers in northern Nigeria.

Blogs

A new initiative will monitor groundwater and will provide a framework for sustainable irrigation practices.

In the media

Source: Phys.org (3 Sep 2021)

An international collaboration has discovered a biological nitrification inhibition trait that, when transferred to growing wheat varieties, can reduce the use of fertilizers and boost yields.

News

Publication reviews the history of CGIAR maize research from 1970 to 2020.

Press releases

Scientists used a wild grass trait that inhibits soil microbes from producing environmentally-harmful nitrogen compounds. Widespread use of the new technology could lower global use of fertilizers for wheat crops.