Bhutan

News

For the first time, Bhutan and Bangladesh are collaborating on evaluating Bangladeshi wheat lines for resistance to yellow and leaf rusts.

Blogs

Delivering Genetic Gain in Wheat is a new project that aims to mitigate climate change threats to wheat and develop disease-resistant and heat-tolerant varieties, writes Cornell’s Ronnie Coffman.

Food security
News

The Feed the Future initiative of the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) featured CIMMYT’s Heat Tolerant Maize for Asia (HTMA) project in a recent newsletter, highlighting it as an exemplary public-private partnership. Launched in 2013, the project is developing heat-resilient hybrid maize for resource-poor smallholder farmers in South Asia whose livelihoods are threatened by climate change.

Features

Wheat is currently considered a secondary cereal in Bhutan because it is grown over an area of only 5,540 acres. However, its contribution to the Bhutanese farming system in terms of food and other requirements is acknowledged. This is particularly relevant in far-flung and remote farming communities where access to imported wheat products is limited. Wheat cultivation has been challenged by many constraints; most notably pressure from diseases (particularly rusts).

News

The “2nd Annual Progress Review and Planning Meeting for the HTMA Project” was held 22-23 July at UAS, Raichur in Karnataka, India. To take advantage of the presence of renowned scientists at this newly established agricultural university, the inaugural session of the meeting was organized as a special seminar on “Global initiatives on climate resilient crops.”