In order for a CIMMYT project to succeed it must have several components – high-quality seed, responsible agronomy, good policy and a functioning market.

Socioeconomic data is integrated into all of CIMMYT’s decisions. Accurate information leads to wise decisions by farmers, policy-makers and researchers. Detailed and timely information about markets, weather, policy, seed and agronomy makes an enormous difference in the livelihoods of smallholder farmers.

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Growing the gains and pruning the pains in producing Africa’s food

Growing the gains and pruning the pains in producing Africa’s food
Why go gaga about GYGA – the Global Yield Gap Atlas? Because GYGA is a crucial pointer to where the greatest gains in food production can be made, and the pains to sidestep, all in a bid to close the yawning gap on hunger by going beyond gigabytes of data to concrete action.

Going further down the path to bolster Africa’s maize sector

Going further down the path to bolster Africa’s maize sector
The long-running Drought Tolerant Maize for Africa (DTMA) Project started in 2007 and ends this month. What next after this long-distance runner, and, more importantly, what will happen to DTMA products? Enter DTMASS, which stands for Drought Tolerant Maize for Africa Seed Scaling, in a seamless transition to the next stage.

Gender bias may limit uptake of climate-smart farm practices, study shows

Gender bias may limit uptake of climate-smart farm practices, study shows
Farmer education programs that fail to address traditional gender roles may sideline women, limiting their  use of  conservation agriculture techniques, which can boost their ability to adapt to climate change, a new research paper states.

The scorecard, as a marathon maize project winds up after eight years

The scorecard, as a marathon maize project winds up after eight years
The Drought Tolerant Maize for Africa (DTMA) Project has contributed to a stronger food system in 13 countries in sub-Saharan Africa, through more than 200 improved maize varieties to help farmers cope with climate change and low-fertility soils through collaboration.

Show and tell: when technology adoption becomes farmer-driven

Show and tell: when technology adoption becomes farmer-driven
The Conservation Agriculture and Smallholder Farmers in Eastern and Southern Africa (CASFESA) Project officially closed in Kenya in March 2015 after two-and-a-half years. During this period, CASFESA worked with maize farmers to promote three main technologies in Embu County, in the eastern region. But that was not all; the success of CASFESA was in the farmers’ vigor to adopt and own these technologies, and share their experience with other farmers.
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