Nutrition

Nutrition

Studies show that greenhouse gas emissions will cause mean global temperatures to rise, leading to extreme weather patterns, less reliable crop yields, declining soil and water quality. About 90 percent of resource-poor farmers and consumers live in tropical environments, which are most vulnerable to climate change. By providing research-based knowledge and tools, CIMMYT helps farmers adapt, bringing food security and prosperity to these areas. In order to resist climate shocks and make better use of resources, CIMMYT works with public and private sector stakeholders to develop drought-resistant maize and wheat, complementing these new varieties with innovative farming practices. CIMMYT is an important contributor to the CGIAR Research Program on Climate Change, Agriculture and Food Security. Under the right conditions, aggressive viruses, bacteria, or fungal pathogens can grow on maize and wheat crops in the field and in storage, devastating grain harvests or making them inedible, unhealthy, and unmarketable. In addition to financial losses, serious disease outbreaks can disrupt grain markets, cause food price spikes, and bring famine to farm communities. Farmers in many of the places CIMMYT works cannot access or afford chemical controls for these pathogens. Additionally, their use can entail environmental and human health risks. Thus, CIMMYT and its partners constantly monitor the evolution and appearance of new, virulent strains and quickly respond to disease outbreaks. Critical components of this research involves finding sources of genetic resistance to breed maize and wheat varieties that can withstand new pathogen attacks, as well as making sure that farmers can obtain and sow the resistant seed.

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  • Maize Lethal Necrosis Disease